October 2011 Blog Posts (22)

No Increased Risk of Breast Cancer for Non-Carriers in Families with BRCA Gene Mutation

A population-based analysis of more than 3,000 families including women with breast cancer, published online October 31, 2011, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, a tri-monthly peer-reviewed journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), found that close relatives of women who carry mutations in a BRCA gene – but who themselves do not have such genetic…

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Added by Peter Hofland, PhD on October 31, 2011 at 5:30pm — No Comments

Key Driver Essential for Metastasis Growth Identified

Scientists at Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia (Canada) have identified a key mechanism of metastasis that could lead to blocking tumor growth if their findings are confirmed.



In a recent issue of Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research (…

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Added by Peter Hofland, PhD on October 31, 2011 at 4:00pm — No Comments

FDA Approves Clinical Trials With VGX-100 for the Treatment of Cancer Patients With Solid Tumors

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today authorized Circadian Technologies Ltd. to initiate clinical trials with its investigational new drug VGX-100. The first Phase I trials will study VGX-100 in patients with a variety of late stage cancers.



VGX-100 is a fully human antibody that acts against the human VEGF-C protein. Treatment for…

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Added by Peter Hofland, PhD on October 31, 2011 at 7:00am — No Comments

Melanoma Research Foundation Launches Campaign to Advance Research and Support Patients

Battling melanoma is tough. Battling a rare and often overlooked melanoma can make the battle even tougher. That's why the Melanoma Research Foundation (MRF) is launching an initiative to give greater voice to patients fighting melanoma that affects the eye.



Ocular melanoma develops in the eye and is the most common eye cancer in adults and the second most common type of melanoma. About 2,000 Americans…

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Added by Peter Hofland, PhD on October 31, 2011 at 7:00am — No Comments

Predicting the Effectiveness of Chemotherapy Agents - Researchers Rewrites Old Theory of Why Thereapies Works

Challenging a half-century-old theory about why chemotherapy agents target cancer, scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have devised a test that can predict how effective the drugs will be by determining whether a patient’s tumor cells are already “primed” for death.



In a study published online by the journal Science on October 27, 2011…

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Added by Peter Hofland, PhD on October 27, 2011 at 5:00pm — No Comments

New Oncolytic Virus Shows Improved Effectiveness In Preclinical Testing

A new fourth-generation oncolytic virus designed to both kill cancer cells and inhibit blood-vessel growth has shown greater effectiveness than earlier versions when tested in animal models of human brain cancer.



Researchers at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James) are developing the oncolytic…

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Added by Peter Hofland, PhD on October 26, 2011 at 7:00pm — No Comments

New Oncolytic Virus Shows Improved Effectiveness In Preclinical Testing

A new fourth-generation oncolytic virus designed to both kill cancer cells and inhibit blood-vessel growth has shown greater effectiveness than earlier versions when tested in animal models of human brain cancer.



Researchers at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James) are developing the oncolytic…

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Added by Peter Hofland, PhD on October 26, 2011 at 7:00pm — No Comments

Incidence Shows that N-nitroso Compounds in Processed Meat May not be a Cause of Colon Cancer.

The addition of ascorbate (vitamin C) or its close relative, erythorbate, and the reduced amount of nitrite added in hot dogs, mandated in 1978, have been accompanied by a steep drop in the death rate from colon cancer, according to data presented at the 10th AACR International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research, held in Boston,…

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Added by Peter Hofland, PhD on October 24, 2011 at 6:00pm — No Comments

Drinking Plenty of Fluids Appears to Reduce Men’s Risk for Bladder Cancer

Drinking plenty of fluids may provide men with some protection against bladder cancer, according to a study presented at the 10th AACR International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research, held in Boston, Massachusetts (USA), Oct. 22-25, 2011.



Although the study did not determine why increased fluid intake might…

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Added by Peter Hofland, PhD on October 24, 2011 at 4:30pm — No Comments

Use of Analgesics -Acetaminophen and Nonaspirin NSAID- Associated With Increased Risk for Renal Cell Carcinoma

Use of acetaminophen and nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) was associated with a significantly increased risk for developing renal cell carcinoma, according to data presented at the 10th AACR International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research, held in Boston, Massachusetts (USA), Oct. 22-25, 2011.…

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Added by Peter Hofland, PhD on October 24, 2011 at 4:30pm — No Comments

Indoor Tanning Increases Risk for Deadly Skin Cancers

Researchers confirmed an association between tanning bed use and an increased risk for three common skin cancers — basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma, according to results presented at the 10th AACR International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research, held in Boston, Massachusetts (USA), Oct. 22-25,…

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Added by Peter Hofland, PhD on October 24, 2011 at 4:30pm — No Comments

Coffee Consumption Associated with Significant Decreased Risk for Basal Cell Carcinoma

Caffeine could be related to an inverse association between basal cell carcinoma risk and consumption of coffee, a study found. The prospective study, presented at the 10th AACR International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research, held in Boston, Massachusetts (USA), Oct. 22-25, 2011, examined the risks of basal cell carcinoma (BCC),…

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Added by Peter Hofland, PhD on October 24, 2011 at 4:30pm — No Comments

Altering Dietary Pattern May Help Prevent Colorectal Cancer Risk in Women

Researchers may have found a specific dietary pattern linked to levels of C-peptide concentrations that increase a woman’s risk for colorectal cancer.



“High red meat intake, fish intake, sugar-sweetened beverage intake, but low coffee, whole grains and high-fat dairy intake, when taken as a whole, seemed to be associated with higher levels of C-peptide in the blood,” said Teresa T. Fung, S.D., R.D., professor of nutrition at Simmons College in Boston, who…

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Added by Peter Hofland, PhD on October 24, 2011 at 4:00pm — No Comments

Researchers at ASU Develop New Class of Affinity Reagents, DNA Synbodies, for Molecular Medicine

An ongoing effort at Arizona State University (ASU) to develop a revolutionary class of reagents that holds great promise for the future of medicine has received a major boost with a three-year, US$ 4 million award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Scientists John Chaput and Joshua LaBaer in the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University will lead a new initiative to develop a state-of-the-art pipeline for generating synthetic affinity reagents called DNA…

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Added by Editorial Team on October 24, 2011 at 2:00pm — No Comments

Obesity in Young Adulthood Associated with Risk for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Later in Life

Body weight in young adulthood and diet appeared to be associated with the risk for non-Hodgkin lymphoma, according to results presented at the 10th AACR International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research, held in Boston, Massachusetts (USA), Oct. 22-25, 2011.



“The causes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) are poorly…

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Added by Peter Hofland, PhD on October 23, 2011 at 4:30pm — No Comments

Study Found Antiparasitic Drugs May Provide Long-Term Protection Against Skin Cancer

An antiparasitic agent used to treat African sleeping sickness (Human African trypanosomiasis or HAT)might someday be used to prevent nonmelanoma skin cancers. Researchers found that Eflornithine (DFMO, or α-difluoromethylornithine), still appeared to protect against nonmelanoma skin cancers years after people stopped taking the drug, according to a poster presented at the 10th AACR International Conference on…

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Added by Peter Hofland, PhD on October 23, 2011 at 4:30pm — No Comments

Weight Gain in Adulthood Increases Risk for Endometrial Cancer in Postmenopausal Women

Postmenopausal women who gained weight during adulthood had an increased risk for endometrial cancer, a cancer that starts in the endometrium or the lining of the uterus (womb), compared with women who maintained a stable weight, according to data from the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Prevention Study II…

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Added by Peter Hofland, PhD on October 23, 2011 at 4:30pm — No Comments

Lower Colorectal Cancer Mortality Rates Associated with Consistent NSAID Use

Postmenopausal women who reported having used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for at least 10 years at the time of enrollment in the Women’s Health Initiative study had a lower risk for death from colorectal cancer compared with women who reported no use of these drugs at enrollment, according to data presented at the 10th AACR International Conference on…

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Added by Peter Hofland, PhD on October 23, 2011 at 4:30pm — No Comments

Possible Link Found Between Bacterium and Colon Cancer

For the first time, scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute have found strikingly high levels of a bacterium in colorectal cancers. The researchers believe that the bacterium may contribute to the disease and could potentially be a key to diagnosing, preventing, and treating it.



In a study published online in the…

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Added by Peter Hofland, PhD on October 17, 2011 at 5:00pm — No Comments

Experts Find Task Force Recommendation Against Common Prostate Cancer Screening Misguided

A US national health advisory panel is recommending against using a common prostate cancer screening test in healthy men, a finding that many cancer experts specializing in the treatment of prostate cancer view as misguided.



The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) reviewed data from five screening trials and concluded that prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing, a widely used screening method, “results in small or no reduction in…

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Added by Peter Hofland, PhD on October 7, 2011 at 7:30pm — No Comments

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