The Success of Tobacco Control: Study Shows Global Drop in Lung Cancer Rates in Young Women

A study published this week as an early online publication in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention shows that according to a recent comprehensive analysis of lung cancer rates for women around the world lung cancer rates are dropping in young women in many regions of the globe. The authors of the article suggest that their data points to the success of tobacco control efforts.

However, the data also shows that rates continue to increase among older women in many other countries, indicating a need for more concentrated efforts to initiate or expand comprehensive tobacco control programs across the globe to curtail future tobacco-related lung cancer deaths.

Incidence of Lung Cancer and Smoking
Lung cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. An estimated 491,200 women died of lung cancer in 2012, more than half (57%) of whom resided in economically developing countries. Differences in smoking patterns account for much of the variation in lung cancer rates around the globe. Smoking among women in became common in North America, Northern Europe, Australia, and New Zealand as early as the 1940s, but remained rare throughout the 20th century in the developing world and in places with strong social norms against it, such as the Middle East. Only recently is female smoking becoming more common in many of these countries, because of increasing social acceptance, newly open markets, and/or targeted marketing by the tobacco industry.


... widespread reduction in lung cancer ... in young women in many parts of the globe is encouraging, and ... reflects ... successful tobacco control efforts and increased awareness about the health hazards of smoking...


Global variation
Because the tobacco epidemic among women has varied globally, researchers led by Lindsey Torre, MSPH documented and compared contemporary trends in lung cancer mortality, to identify opportunities for intervention. They used the World Health Organization's Cancer Mortality Database covering populations on 10 six continents to calculate age-standardized lung cancer death rates during 2006 to 2010 and annual percent change in rates for available years from 1985 to 2011 and for the most recent five years for which data is available by population and age group (30–49 and 50–74 years).

Mortality
Lung cancer mortality rates among young women (30-49 years) were stable or declining in 47 of the 52 populations examined. In contrast, among older women (50-74 years), rates were increasing for more than half (36/64) of populations examined, including most countries in Southern, Eastern, and Western Europe and South America. Lung cancer mortality rates (per 100,000) during 2006-2010 ranged from 0.7 in Costa Rica to 14.8 in Hungary among young women and from 8.8 in Georgia to 120.0 in Scotland among older women. For both age groups, rates were highest in parts of Europe (Scotland, Hungary, Denmark) and North America and lowest in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

A great opportunity
"The widespread reduction in lung cancer we found in young women in many parts of the globe is encouraging, and probably reflects both successful tobacco control efforts and increased awareness about the health hazards of smoking," said Torre. "The greatest opportunity we have right now for slowing a tobacco-fueled epidemic is in those countries where smoking among women is rare, such as Africa and most of Asia. And while decreasing lung cancer death rates are encouraging, many countries have yet to implement the kinds of comprehensive tobacco control measures that have led to drops in other countries."

For more information:
Torre LA, Siegel RL, Ward EM, Jemal A. International Variation in Lung Cancer Mortality Rates and Trends among Women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. Published Online First May 16, 2014; doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-1220 [Article]

Copyright © 2014 InPress Media Group/Sunvalley Communication. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of InPress Media Group/Sunvalley Communication content, including by framing or similar means, is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of InPress Media Group/Sunvalley Communication. InPress Media Group/Sunvalley Communication shall not be liable for any errors or delays in the content, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon. Onco'Zine and Oncozine are registered trademarks and trademarks of Sunvalley Communication around the world.

Views: 29

Comment

You need to be a member of Onco'Zine to add comments!

Join Onco'Zine

Register for free to view all the Onco'Zine - The International Oncology Network content:

ADVERTISEMENT/MEDIA PARTNER

Onco'Zine is present here

Bookmark / Share

CONNECT WITH US AND

JOIN THE CONVERSATION


© 2017   Created by Peter Hofland, PhD.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service

Find us on Google+