Friday, December 14, 2018

Despite Receiving Similar Treatment as White Women, Black Women have Worse Breast Cancer Outcomes

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in the United States and worldwide. Furthermore, hormone-receptor–positive, axillary node–negative disease accounts for approximately half of all cases of breast cancer in the United States. Undated study results from the Trial Assigning IndividuaLized Options for TReatment or TAILORx study show that even with equivalent treatments in women with hormone receptor-positive,...

The Future of Medicine is Bright: Personalized Medicine, Predictive Analytics and Big Data

Modern medicine is to change dramatically. Over the past 200 years medicine has seen extraordinary developments and advances. From microbiology to the sequencing of the human genome, the advent of CRISPR–Cas genome editing to potentially treat disease and advance drug discovery and development, as well as a better understanding of underlying biology of cancer and hematological disease, and the availability...

Proof-of-Concept Study of Live Tumor Cell Biomarker Test in Prostate Cancer

Results of a risk stratification study designed to demonstrate the ability of a new live tumor cell phenotypic biomarker test to identify patients with low and intermediate grade prostate cancer at risk of aggressive disease, were published in Urology. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the United States, with an estimated 164,690 news cases diagnosed...

Changing Behaviors: Cigarette Smoking Declines As Vaping Increases in Popularity

Vaping and e-cigarettes have become more popular than tobacco cigarettes with teens. But how does vaping influence trends in smoking? And how does vaping impact trends in smoking and smoking cessation in youths and young adults? A comprehensive analysis, funded in part by the National Cancer Institute, examined the relationship between vaping and smoking among youth and young adults. The...

Colorectal Cancer Screening Helps Avoids Intense Treatments in Men

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common form of cancer in the world. In Finland, a country with approximately 5.5 million people (compare the United States population in 2017 was 325.70 million), approximately 3,000 new patient cases are diagnosed every year, and roughly 1,200 patients die of the disease. Between 2004 and 2016, an extensive screening program was conducted in...

Battling Obesity and Cancer – An Integrated Team’s Approach

When the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO®) conducted the National Cancer Opinion Survey in July 2017, the results revealed something rather surprising. The survey showed that while 78 percent and 66 percent of respondents correctly identified tobacco use and sun exposure, respectively, as risk factors for cancer, only 31 percent correctly identified obesity as a risk factor for...

Pancreatic Cancer Risk in Adulthood Affected by Weight During Adolescence

Adolescent obesity may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer later in life with up to a four-fold increased risk. This is the conclusion of a study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The study's results also suggest that overweight and even higher weight within the normal weight range in men may increase pancreatic...

Cancer Mortality May Increase for Successive Generations of Latino Immigrants

In 2016 the United States Census Bureau estimated that 18% of the population in the continental United States and Hawaii, approximately 57.5 million people, identified themselves as Hispanic or Latino. Although cancer is the leading cause of death among Latinos, accounting for 21% of deaths, they are generally less likely than non-Hispanic whites to be diagnosed with the most common...

Culturally Tailored Messages Increase HPV Vaccination of Asian American Adolescents

Results from a pilot study supported by the National Cancer Institute’s Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities and presented at the 11th AACR Conference on The Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved, held November 2-5, 2018 in the Sheraton New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, showed the effects of specifically designed culturally...

Survey Shows Public to be Embarrassingly Ignorant about Lung Cancer

Earlier today, two panels of renowned lung cancer experts, advocates and survivors discussed recent breakthroughs in lung cancer screening and the progress and hope gained through scientific breakthroughs, research funding and patient advocacy. During the meeting, part of the National Lung Cancer Awareness Month Kickoff, results of a national survey were released highlighting Americans’ lack of awareness about lung cancer,...

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